A season of thanksgiving

23 11 2010

The only time of the year that Americans stop what they are doing and reflect on their blessings is Thanksgiving.  Typically, we live in a world of self-centered consumerism, but the end of November normally encourages people to stop what they are doing and reflect.  This is a good thing, and a bad thing.

It is a good thing because we need to stop and reflect.  We need to look at our blessings.  We need to stop and give thanks to others.

It is a bad thing because this is something that needs to happen on a regular basis.  Every day is a blessing.  Every day is one that deserves thanksgiving.

So how are we teaching kids to step back and give thanks.  Instead of encouraging kids to buy up the latest gadgets and gizmos, we need to be teaching kids how to stop, give thanks, and give to others.  Instead of developing a spirit of consumerism amongst kids by getting them to compete against each other in who can have the best, we need to be teaching kids who can be humble and thankful for what they have.

This is a season to teach children to give thanks and give back.  This is a season when we can teach kids that they can do things for others and give toward others.   This is a season to react against consumerism.

But don’t let it end on Thursday!  Maintain this spirit throughout the year!  Develop monthly family service projects.  Develop weekly times to give to others.  Develop daily opportunities for families to give thanks in all circumstances and reflect on the blessings God has given them.

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